You are God’s chosen vessel

That’s exactly what you are.  No matter what you “feel like”,  look like, nor how many times you’ve been broken.  If you belong to God, He has chosen YOU for a beautiful work.  You may look around and think that others are prettier, smarter, more talented, more this or that… but you, dear friend, in the Master’s loving hands, are everything He needs to bless lives through you.

Recently, this poem came across my desk, and it’s too true not to share.
Much love to each of you, God’s chosen vessels~

Jennifer   

The Master was searching for a vessel to use;
On the shelf there were many – which one would He choose?
Take me, cried the gold one, I’m shiny and bright,
I’m of great value and I do things just right.
My beauty and luster will outshine the rest
And for someone like You, Master, gold would be the best!

The Master passed on with no word at all;
He looked at a silver urn, narrow and tall;
I’ll serve You, dear Master, I’ll pour out Your wine
And I’ll be at Your table whenever You dine,
My lines are so graceful, my carvings so true,
And my silver will always compliment You.

Unheeding the Master passed on to the brass,
It was widemouthed and shallow, and polished like glass.
Here! Here! cried the vessel, I know I will do,
Place me on Your table for all men to view.

Look at me, called the goblet of crystal so clear,
My transparency shows my contents so dear,
Though fragile am I, I will serve You with pride,
And I’m sure I’ll be happy in Your house to abide.

The Master came next to a vessel of wood,
Polished and carved, it solidly stood.
You may use me, dear Master, the wooden bowl said,
But I’d rather You used me for fruit, not for bread!

Then the Master looked down and saw a vessel of clay.
Empty and broken it helplessly lay.
No hope had the vessel that the Master might choose,
To cleanse and make whole, to fill and to use.

Ah! This is the vessel I’ve been hoping to find,
I will mend and use it and make it all Mine.
I need not the vessel with pride of its self;
Nor the one who is narrow to sit on the shelf;
Nor the one who is big mouthed and shallow and loud;
Nor one who displays his contents so proud;
Not the one who thinks he can do all things just right;
But this plain earthy vessel filled with My power and might.

Then gently He lifted the vessel of clay.
Mended and cleansed it and filled it that day.
Spoke to it kindly. “There’s work you must do,
Just pour out to others as I pour into you.”
By Beulah V. Cornwall

PS: This is a McCarty Pottery pitcher.  It’s made just a few miles from where we live.  McCarty Pottery has been featured in Southern Living Magazine many times, and is a beloved collectible in this region of the country.  The unique thing about this pottery is that each piece has a reference to the Mississippi River on it (usually in the form of a dark line, as in the picture above.)  For more info on McCarty Pottery, click here.

About SmellingCoffee

I'm a Jesus-loving, husband-loving, family-loving minister's wife and mom to two teenagers, making our home and serving our Lord in the Mississippi Delta. I study, teach, speak, and write for the greatest Boss in the universe. "Faith, Family, Food, Fun, and Living Life brewed in the fragrance of the knowledge of Jesus Christ in every place": That's what you'll find at SmellingCoffee.com

Comments

  1. Loved the poem! Christ called the "most unlikely" men to follow Him. I get comfort from that. Knowing that I, with all my frailties, can be used by such an awesome God! Thank you, Jennifer 🙂

  2. Love it! So glad He prefers to use jars of clay, it's He who does the beautiful work, not us, and that just makes it more beautiful!!

  3. That is a beautiful poem, and yes God uses the most unlikely to do his work and those who think they should be used usually sit on the shelf, oh thank you lord for using simply things in life for your glory.

  4. Jennifer, what a beautiful poem! This is a wonderful reminder of how we don't bring anything but our willingness to surrender and be used by Him. "We" get in the way all too often.

    Love you,
    Debbie